Talent Stack

November 12, 2018

https://static.nytimes.com/email-content/SL_7648.html?nlid=67438024

What’s the problem?

If your identity is tied up in a singular skill, eg. writing, especially if it is considered ‘creative’ by society, there’s a high chance you will get stressed at improving, or generating lots of good work.

Writing is what you must do. And you must do it well. Out of ideas. You’re done.

By putting all your eggs in the writing’ basket, you’ve become more fragile, and exposed to much more risk.

Do this:

Spread yourself over 6-7 areas of interest/skills and you will always be eager to spend time in 1 or 2. 

Ok, sounds good. What do I do next?

In terms of picking the skills, I like a need-based approach. For example, if you are working on a project that needs some decent photographs, start learning the basics, and see if you can get a ‘good enough’ result.

If a project, or better - a deadline demands it, you will learn what you need. You will be much more effective with your time than if you are doing something “because you think it’s worthwhile, or will make me money.”

Allow yourself to be steered into ‘strategic procrastination’.

Can’t bear to pick up your camera and take photos? Start drawing.

Can’t bear to put pen to paper? Start experimenting with a camera.

And then what happens?

By stretching your net over many different skills, it’s likely your creative reservoir and motivation around your primary skill will quickly fill up with new ideas, connections and inspiration. 

Less burnout. More fun.

And…?

I bet without even realizing, you will be rushing back to your notepad/easel filled with energy and ideas.